What do we know about Race and Equality?

Race to a group of people defined by their race, colour, nationality (including citizenship) or ethnic or national origins refers[1]. Data used in monitoring tends to be based on Office of National Statistics questions for ethnicity and therefore is often referred to as ‘Ethnicity’.

There are many aspects to race, including ethnic and racial groups – an individual can belong to one or many racial groups, such as British Asians and/or British Sikhs, or British Irish and/or Romany Gypsies / Irish Traveller.

The Scottish Government’s Race Equality Framework for Scotland recognises that people from minority ethnic communities tends to face poorer outcomes than average across generations, this includes lower employment rates, higher risk of poverty, under-representation in public life and day-to-day experiences of racism that may also involve hate crime or incidents[2].

Interesting #Equalityfacts about Race in Fife

Low proportion of non-British Fifers

Estimates from 2018 indicate that around 11000 Fifers are non-British (3% of the population), of which around 7000 are from the EU (1.9%) and 4000 are non-EU nationals (1.1%). This is consistently less than half the Scottish averages of 6.7% being non-British, of which 4.2% are EU nationals and 2.5% non-EU.

Asian ethnicity the most common non-white ethnic group in Fife
81.9% of Fife’s population ethnicity being ‘White Scottish’ (compared to 78.1% nationally) and consistently lower proportions for other groups. Of note is the Asian ethnicity increased to 2.5% nationally and 1.9% in Fife, becoming the most common (non-white) minority ethnic group. Only 2.9% of Fifers use a language other than English at home.

Continued high levels of educational participation for minority ethnic young people

The average participation of 16-19 year olds in Fife in 2018 was 90.1%, and tends to be higher for young people of Mixed or multiple, Asian, African, Caribbean or Black ethnicity at 94.2% and lower for White ethnicity.

Low levels MA starts for minority ethnic young people

Access to MA is still ow however with Modern Apprenticeships starts in the previous year in Fife who self-identified as being from a Mixed or Multiple; Asian; African; Caribbean or Black; and Other ethnic group is 0.6%.

Falling employment of ethnic minority groups

Employment rate statistics for ethnic minorities in the Mid Scotland and Fife region show a fall of -13% in the period 2015 to 2016 which was the highest change across Scotland. This is then followed by a fall of -3.1% in 2016-2017 to 53.1%.

Increasing racially related hate crime and incidents over the previous year

In Fife, partial data shows that there were 202 charges reported for racially aggravated crime (83 in Dunfermline, 119 in Kirkcaldy) in 2017-2018, increasing from the previous year (190). Across Scotland this has decreased from the highest in 2011 (4547) to 3,249 in 2017.

Over 1/3rd of refugees in Fife are children

In May 2018, there were 97 refugees in total in Fife, 37 of which were children and 6 were born in Scotland.

Demography

Population

In 2018[3], the NRS estimated that around 11000 Fifers are non-British, of which around 7000 are from the EU and 4000 are non-EU nationals.

All Total British Total Non-British EU Non-EU
Area estimate CI +/- estimate CI +/- estimate CI +/- estimate CI +/- estimate CI +/-
Scotland 5,319 z 4,960 84 358 22 223 18 135 14
Fife 364 z 353 33 11 6 7 5 4 3

Table 150 British, EU and non-EU population in Fife and Scotland, June 2018

Source: NRS (29 November 2018) Population by Country of Birth and Nationality, Scotland, 2017 3b

Ethnicity

The census remains the more detailed source of information on race for citizens in Fife and Scotland. From 2001, the percentage of people in Scotland from minority ethnic groups had doubled from 2% to 4%. The Asian population is the largest minority ethnic group (2.7% or 141,000 people), within which the largest ethnic category is Pakistani, at 1% of the total population. African, Caribbean or Black groups made up close to 1% of the population. Mixed or multiple ethnic groups represented 0.4% (20,000) and other ethnic groups 0.3% (14,000) of the total population.

2011 Census categories % of Total Population % of Minority Ethnic Base
African 0.6 14 30,000
Asian/Asian Scottish/Asian British 2.7 67 141,000
Caribbean or Black 0.1 3 7,000
Mixed/Multiple ethnic groups 0.4 9 20,000
Other ethnic group 0.3 7 14,000
White 96.0 n/a 5,084,000
All Minority Ethnic Population 4.0 100 211,000
All Population 100 n/a 5,295,000

Table 151 Census 2011 Ethnicities in Scotland

Fife has a relatively low proportion of people from minority groups (2.4%), compared to Glasgow City at 12% or the City of Edinburgh and in Aberdeen City where it was at 8%. The new category for the 2011 Census of “White Polish” shows that there are 3058 people that have classified themselves in this category, and now make up 0.8% of the Fife population.

Fife Scotland
% White – Scottish 85.7 84.0
% White – Other British 8.6 7.9
% White – Irish 0.6 1.0
% White – Polish 0.8 1.2
% White – Other 1.9 2.0
% Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British 1.6 2.7
% Other ethnic groups 0.8 1.3
(Combined) Minority Ethnic Group 2.4 4.0

Table 152 Ethnicity – Fife and Scotland

Source: Scotland’s Census 2011

The more recent statistics from the 2016 Scottish Surveys Core Questions[4] show a similar distribution with 81.9% of Fife’s population ethnicity being ‘White Scottish’ (compared to 78.1% nationally) and consistently lower proportions for other groups. Of note is the Asian ethnicity increased to 2.5% nationally and 1.9% in Fife, becoming the most common (non-white) minority ethnic group.

Responses %
Area White: Scottish White: Other British White: Polish White: Other[5]
(all) Scotland 78.1 ± 0.8 12.2 ± 0.6 1.8 ± 0.3 3.6 ± 0.3
Fife 81.9 ± 2.9 10.8 ± 2.2 1.0 ± 0.7 3.4 ± 1.3

 

Responses %
Area Asian[6] All other ethnic groups[7]
(all) Scotland 2.5 ± 0.3 1.7 ± 0.2
Fife 1.9 ± 1.2 0.7 ± 0.6

Table 153  Ethnicity in Fife and Scotland, 2016

Source: SSCQ (2016) Data Tables 4.2 

Ethnicity – Further details

Looking at a further breakdown of census data, Fife has a lower proportion than the national average of people who identify as Irish (0.62% vs 1.02%) and Polish (0.84% vs 1.16%) and this pattern is also present within the white ethnic community in Fife.

  White

Population

 Scottish Other British
Scotland 5,084,407 96.02% 4,445,678 83.95% 417,109 7.88%
Fife 356,550 97.63% 312,957 85.70% 31,464 8.62%
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION
Scotland 4,445,678 87.44% 417,109 8.20%
Fife 312,957 87.77% 31,464 8.82%

 

  Irish Gypsy  / Traveller Polish Other White  
Scotland 54,090 1.02% 4,212 0.08% 61,201 1.16% 102,117 1.93%  
Fife 2,260 0.62% 316 0.09% 3,058 0.84% 6,495 1.78%  
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION
Scotland 54,090 1.06% 4,212 0.08% 61,201 1.20% 102,117 2.01%  
Fife 2,260 0.63% 316 0.09% 3,058 0.86% 6,495 1.82%  

Table 154 Detailed Census 2011 Breakdown of White Ethnicities

Source: Scotland’s Census 2011 – Ethnic group : Table KS201SC

Fife has a lower proportion than the national average of people who identify as Pakistani (0.52% vs 0.93%), Bangladeshi (0.03% vs 0.07%) Indian (0.29% vs 0.62%), Chinese (0.48% vs 0.64%) and African (0.19% vs 0.55%).

Within the Asian community in Fife, we can see a lower proportion of Indian and Bangladeshi ethnicity and a higher proportion of the Chinese community (30.18% vs 23.96%). Within the African population, there is a higher proportion of ‘Other African’ (2.84% vs 1.5%) while the Caribbean ethnicity directly comparable to national distribution at 0.06%.

   

Asian Ethnicity

Pakistani, Pakistani Scottish or Pakistani British Indian, Indian Scottish or Indian British
Scotland 140,678 2.66% 49,381 0.93% 32,706 0.62%  
Fife 5,748 1.57% 1,902 0.52% 1,066 0.29%  
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION  
Scotland     49,381 35.10% 32,706 23.25%  
Fife     1,902 33.09% 1,066 18.55%  

 

  Bangladeshi, Bangladeshi Scottish or Bangladeshi British Chinese, Chinese Scottish or Chinese British Other Asian  
Scotland 3,788 0.07% 33,706 0.64% 21,097 0.40%
Fife 118 0.03% 1,735 0.48% 927 0.25%
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION
Scotland     33,706 23.96% 21,097 15.00%
Fife     1,735 30.18% 927 16.13%

 

  African Ethnicity African, African Scottish or African British Other African
Scotland 29,638 0.56% 29,186 0.55% 452 0.01%
Fife 704 0.19% 684 0.19% 20 0.01%
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION
Scotland     29,186 98.47% 452 1.53%
Fife     684 97.16% 20 2.84%

 

  Caribbean Ethnicity Caribbean, Caribbean Scottish or Caribbean British Black, Black Scottish or Black British Other Caribbean or Black
Scotland 6,540 0.12% 3,430 0.06% 2,380 0.04% 730 0.01%
Fife 422 0.12% 234 0.06% 141 0.04% 47 0.01%
WITHIN FIFE ETHNIC POPULATION
Scotland     3,430 52.45% 2,380 36.39% 730 11.16%
Fife     234 55.45% 141 33.41% 47 11.14%

 Table 155 Detailed Census 2011 Breakdown of Minority Ethnicities

Source: Scotland’s Census 2011 – Table KS201SC – Ethnic group

Most ethnic groups are evenly distributed in terms of age profile and sex, with the exception of more females (39%) than males (28%) in the 20-24 age group of people of the “Asian: Bangladeshi” ethnicity. and in the age group of 0-4, females account for 20% while males account for only 3% (see further details in Fife Council Information and Statistics on Equality Groups in Fife 2016 (Feb 2017) report[8]).

Ethnicity Asian Pakistani, Pakistani Scottish or Pakistani British Indian, Indian Scottish or Indian British Bangladeshi Scottish or Bangladeshi British Chinese, Chinese Scottish or Chinese British Other Asian
Fife 5748 1902 1066 118 1735 927
Males 2813 999 576 72 777 389
Females 2935 903 490 46 958 538

 

Ethnicity African African, African Scottish or African British Other African Caribbean or Black Caribbean, Caribbean Scottish or Caribbean British Black, Black Scottish or Black British Other Caribbean or Black
Fife 704 684 20 422 234 141 47
Males 350 339 11 228 128 79 21
Females 354 345 9 194 106 62 26

Table 156 Detailed Census 2011 Breakdown of Minority Ethnicities and Gender

Source: Scotland’s Census 2011 – Table KS201SC – Ethnic group

Asylum Seekers

The Home Office releases quarterly official figures for asylum seekers and refugees for the whole UK[9]. In Scotland by September 2017, 3,548 asylum seekers were supported under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999, the majority of which in the Glasgow and surrounding area. The British Red Cross in Scotland report to the EHRiC (2017)[10] describes the number of destitute refugees and asylum seekers as having increased from 326 in 2014 to 820 in 2016.

As of March 2018, the Home Office reports that Fife has no asylum seekers living in dispersed accommodation, 1 supported under Section 95 and 1 in receipt of subsistence only:

Quarter Area Total supported under Section 95 In receipt of subsistence
only
In dispersed accommodation
2017 Q1 UK 39,365 2,861 36,504
2017 Q1 Scotland 3,555 70 3,485
2017 Q1 Fife 5 5 0
2017 Q2 UK 38,954 2,827 36,127
2017 Q2 Scotland 3,649 66 3,583
2017 Q2 Fife 5 5 0
2017 Q3 UK 39,414 2,904 36,510
2017 Q3 Scotland 3,548 72 3,476
2017 Q3 Fife 5 5 0
2017 Q4 UK 40,736 3,020 37,716
2017 Q4 Scotland 3,689 69 3,620
2017 Q4 Fife 1 1 0
2018 Q1 UK 42,352 3,220 39,132
2018 Q1 Scotland 3,841 67 3,774
2018 Q1 Fife 1 1 0
2018 Q2 UK 42,808 2,932 39,876
2018 Q2 Scotland 3,916 60 3,856
2018 Q2 Fife 0 0 0
2018 Q3 UK 43,383 2,902 40,481
2018 Q3 Scotland 4,056 65 3,991
2018 Q3 Fife 0 0 0

Table 157 Asylum seekers in Fife

Source: Home Office – Immigration statistics (September 2018)  Volume 4 q16

Refugees

Fife has a tracked history of welcoming and supporting refugees. Over the last 30 years, people from countries including Afghanistan, Uganda and Kosovo have sought refuge status and gained asylum in Fife. Responding to the Syrian crisis, Fife Council has confirmed that the Kingdom will welcome Syrian refugees. For more information visit the Fife Council Supporting Refugees – Crisis in Syria webpage by clicking here.

Following the Syrian crisis, it is expected to welcome around 140 people to Fife over the next four years. Home Office figures show that between Q4 2017 and Q1 2018, 11 persons registered under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme[11], with the highest number recorded in Q1 2017 (23).

By contrast to the Home Office, Fife Council reports that as of May 2018, there were 97 refugees in total in Fife, 37 of which were children and 6 were born in Scotland[12].

Quarter Area Total supported under Section 95
2017 Q1 UK 1,601
2017 Q1 Scotland 366
2017 Q1 Fife 23
2017 Q2 UK 1,228
2017 Q2 Scotland 146
2017 Q2 Fife 8
2017 Q3 UK 859
2017 Q3 Scotland 70
2017 Q3 Fife 5
2017 Q4 UK 1,144
2017 Q4 Scotland 127
2017 Q4 Fife 2
2018 Q1 UK 1,111
2018 Q1 Scotland 165
2018 Q1 Fife 11
2018 Q2 UK 1,202
2018 Q2 Scotland 157
2018 Q2 Fife 0
2018 Q3 UK 1,110
2018 Q3 Scotland 114
2018 Q3 Fife 7

Table 158 Refugees (and others) resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement scheme, including dependants, Fife Scotland and UK

Source: Home Office – Immigration statistics (September 2018) Volume 4 q16

National Identity[13]

In terms distribution in national identity, Fife follows Scotland’s profile closely, with 63.8% of Fifers identifying only with a Scottish identity (compared to 62.4% nationally):

Fife Scotland
% Scottish identity only 63.8 62.4
% British identity only 7.9 8.4
% Scottish and British identities only 18.2 18.3
% Scottish and any other identities 1.8 1.9
% English identity only 2.6 2.3
% Any other combination of UK identities (UK only) 2.2 2.0
% Other identity 3.2 4.4
% Other identity and at least one UK identity 0.3 0.3

Table 159 National identity – Fife and Scotland

This is similar for Fifer’s countries of birth, however there is a slightly higher proportion of residents from England (9.7% vs 8.7%) and a slightly lower proportion from other countries (3.2% vs 4%).

  Fife Scotland
% Scotland 83.6 83.3
% England 9.7 8.7
% Wales 0.4 0.3
% Northern Ireland 0.6 0.7
% Republic of Ireland 0.3 0.4
% Other EU countries (inc UK part not specified) 2.2 2.6
% Other countries 3.2 4.0

Table 160 Country of birth – Fife and Scotland

The majority of Fifers born outside the UK have been resident for over 10 years (43.9%) compared to the national average (37.4%); while those that have been for less 2 years is also lower (20.9% vs 22.1%) suggesting a more settled minority ethnic population than a transient one.

  Fife Scotland
All people born outside the UK 20693 369284
% Resident in UK for less than 2 years 20.9 22.1
% Resident in UK for 2 years or more but less than 5 years 20.4 21.7
% Resident in UK for 5 years or more but less than 10 years 14.8 18.8
% Resident in UK for 10 years or more 43.9 37.4

Table 161 Length of residence in UK – Fife and Scotland

Language

A higher proportion of Fifers are able to speak Scots (34.9% vs 30.1), and a lower proportion is able to speak Gaelic (0.4% vs 1.1%). Only 2.9% of Fifers used a language other than English at home.

All people aged 3 and over Fife Scotland
% Speaks English well or very well 98.9 98.6
% Does not speak English well 1.0 1.2
% Does not speak English at all 0.2 0.2
% Able to speak Gaelic 0.4 1.1
% Able to speak Scots 34.9 30.1
% Uses a language other than English at home 2.9 3.9

Table 162 Language – Fife and Scotland

Education

Pupil Ethnicity

Diversity of pupils tends to be highest in primary, decreases in secondary and is low special schools locally and nationally. The Pupil Census shows a higher proportion of ethnic minority pupils in schools than would be expected from the ethnic minority share of the population at large this is mainly explained by the younger age profile of the ethnic minority population, and with this a higher proportion of households with dependent age children.

Fife’s pupil ethnic mix is nearly half as diverse to the national average across primary (4.4%), secondary (3.7%) and with the figure not being known for special schools. Glasgow is consistently the most diverse.

Count Percentage
Minority ethnic[14] White other[15] Not known Minority ethnic White other Not known  
PRIMARY
Fife      1,274      1,471         599 4.4 5.0 2.0  
Glasgow City      9,671      2,771      2,591 23.4 6.7 6.3  
All local authorities     32,317     24,063      9,358          8.1          6.0          2.3  
Grant aided           37             9  *            8.0          1.9  *  
SECONDARY
Fife         742         691         217            3.7          3.4          1.1  
Glasgow City      4,989      1,383         789          19.7          5.5          3.1  
All local authorities     18,177     12,224      3,106            6.5          4.3          1.1  
Grant aided           63           17           10          10.7          2.9          1.7  
SPECIAL SCHOOLS
Fife * * 6   * * 4.4  
Glasgow City 285 54 59   23.0 4.4 4.8  
All local authorities 666 308 161   10.2 4.7 2.5  

 Table 163 Pupils who are assessed or declared as having a disability Fife and Scotland

Source: Pupil census 2017 (29 Mar 2018) 6.13, 7.9 & 8.10

The pupil census for the period 2016-2017 shows that 9 young people attending school were from asylum seeker families and that 24 were refugees, an increase of 11 over the previous year: 

2016 2017
Asylum seeker Refugee Asylum seeker Refugee
Fife 6 13 9 24
Glasgow City 715 1,543 898 1,598
All local authorities 882 2,165   1,101 2,462

 Table 164  Asylum seekers and refugees in publicly funded schools, Fife Glasgow and Scotland

Source: Pupil census 2017 (29 Mar 2018) 5.6

Pupil Attainment

In terms of achievement, minority ethnic groups tend to have high levels of education, with attainment being consistently high for Asian-Chinese pupils with 90.8% achieving SCQF6 or higher, with the ethnic group of those with lowest attainment (50.6% with 1 or more SCQF6) not being disclosed. The national average reduced over the previous year to 61.2% of all leavers:

2015/16 2016/17
  1 or more
at SCQF
Level 4 or
better
1 or more at SCQF Level 5 or better 1 or more at SCQF Level 6 or better 1 or more
at SCQF
Level 4 or
better
1 or more at SCQF Level 5 or better 1 or more at SCQF Level 6 or better
White – Scottish 96.3 85.4 61.1 96.3 85.8 60.5
White – non-Scottish 96.1 85.6 62.3 95.4 86.2 61.8
White – UK n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
White – Other n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Mixed or multiple ethnic groups 96.4 88.9 72.2 97.3 90.2 71.8
Asian – Indian 98.7 94.2 76.5 99.2 94.5 79.5
Asian – Pakistani 99.0 92.1 73.2 98.5 93.5 75.0
Asian – Chinese 99.5 96.4 91.8 99.5 98.9 90.8
Asian – Other 97.8 92.2 76.9 98.2 93.6 77.6
African/ Black/ Caribbean2 99.7 95.4 76.6 97.9 94.8 75.9
All other categories3 94.3 82.9 61.7 95.8 86.5 66.2
Not Disclosed/Not known 93.6 79.9 55.7 92.0 74.5 50.6
All Leavers 96.3 85.6 61.7 96.3 86.1 61.2

Table 165 Percentage of school leavers by attainment at SCQF Level 4 to 6, by race, 2009/10 to 2016/17

Source: Attainment and Leaver Destinations 2016/2017 (19 June 2018)

Participation Measures and ethnicity

The average participation of 16-19 year olds in Fife in 2018 was 90.1%, and tends to be higher for young people of Mixed or multiple, Asian, African, Caribbean or Black ethnicity at 94.2% and lower for White ethnicity. The ethnicity of young people with lowest participation (89.6%) remains not known / disclosed:

Figure 56 % participation by ethnicity, in Fife 2016-2018

Source: SDS (28 August 2018) Annual Participation Measure – Interactive Tables
[SDS Annual Participation Measure]

Gypsy and Traveller attainment

Educational attainment of Gypsy/Traveller children and young people is not apparent in the figures as it may sometimes be recorded across the ‘White Other/UK/non-Scottish’, Mixed, or Not Disclosed/Not known. However, it is well-known that Gypsy/Travellers were less likely to be full-time students than the general population aged 16-24. 38% of Gypsy/Travellers were full-time students compared to 46% of the population in this age group[16]. 50% of Gypsy/Travellers aged 16 and over had no qualifications compared to 27% of the population as a whole. 

Source: Gypsy/Travellers in Scotland – A Comprehensive Analysis of the 2011 Census
Chart 28: Gypsy/Travellers by Highest Level of Qualification – people aged 16 and over
 

Teacher Ethnicity – Primary, Secondary and Special Schools

Ethnicity profiles of education staff are here as a fair and proportionate representation in the key areas of public life such as education is crucial in shaping norms and the future of community cohesion and safety in Scotland[17]. There is also increasing evidence of a need for greater diversity of people taking STEM courses and training programmes and employed in the STEM sectors and covers gender equality as well as race and disability among other disparities[18].

The 2017 Teacher census reports Fife as having a higher proportion of White-Scottish and a lower proportion of White-other teachers across primary (86%), secondary (77%) and special schools (79%), which is consistent with Fife overall ethnic profile.

Primary school teachers
  White-Scottish White-other British White-other Ethnic minority Not disclosed
Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number
Fife 1,489 86 211 12 25 1 9 0 28
All local authorities 16,312 70 6,201 27 531 2 253 1 1,158
Secondary school teachers
  White-Scottish White-other British Isles White-other Ethnic minority Not disclosed
Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number
Fife 1,136 77 254 17 67 5 21 1 108
All local authorities 13,759 63 6,787 31 825 4 393 2 1,335
Special school teachers
  White-Scottish White-Other British Isles White-other Ethnic minority Not disclosed
  Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number %(1) Number
Fife 62 79 12 15 * * * * 5
All local authorities 1,154 68 432 25 85 5 26 2 84

Table 166 Ethnicity of teachers in Fife and Scotland

Source: Teacher Census 2017 (8 Mar 2018) 7.8 8.8 and 9.7

Tertiary Education Staff

The Fife College race / ethnicity profile for 2015-2016 was 95% of staff with a race or ethnicity declared as White, rising to 97% by the end of 2015-16. This may be due to a number of staff not declaring a race or ethnicity or have indicated they would prefer not to say being at 2.6% [19].

Exclusion Rates

The EHRC Race Report[20] show that across the UK Black Caribbean and Mixed White/Black Caribbean children tend to have rates of permanent exclusion about three times that of the pupil population as a whole.

This trend is not replicated in Scotland with the rate per 1000 pupil being lower (19.4) than the average (26.8). There is no further Fife specific area data at this time:

   
 
Rates per 1,000 pupils
  Total cases of exclusions Number of pupils excluded Total pupil numbers(1) Cases of exclusion Pupils excluded
Total 18,377(6) 10,736 684,641 26.8 15.7
White – Scottish 16,053 9,262 555,876 28.9 16.7
White – non-Scottish(2) 1,352 818 68,911 19.6 11.9
Mixed or multiple ethnic groups 172 116 8,408 20.5 13.8
Asian(3) 247 182 26,662 9.3 6.8
African/Black/Caribbean(4) 147 108 7,589 19.4 14.2
Other 100 65 5,250 19.0 12.4
Not known/not disclosed 306 185 11,945 25.6 15.5

Table 167 Cases of exclusion by ethnic background of pupils

Source: Exclusions dataset 2016/17 (14 Jun 2018)

Tertiary education

Fife College reports 97.6% of enrolments by students of a white background in 2016/2017, with the ‘other’ category the second most common and the total minority ethnic at 2.4%. This reflects the local population profile:

Ethnic background Student Count Full time equivalent  

%

White 30,458 10296.671 97.6%
Other 273 83.722 0.8%
Indian 44 24.086 0.2%
Pakistani 75 51.486 0.5%
Bangladeshi 5 4.449 0.0%
Chinese 28 16.868 0.2%
Black Caribbean 13 3.251 0.0%
Black African 77 40.408 0.4%
Black Other 11 2.865 0.0%
Arab 26 15.539 0.1%
Black, Black Scottish or Black Other 32 14.729 0.1%
OVERALL 31,042 10554.07 100.0%
Minority Ethnic 584

 

257.403 2.4%

Table 168 Number of enrolments by Ethnic background for year 2016-17, Fife

Source: InFact Database (June 2018) 

Modern Apprenticeships (MA)

Ethnic minorities tend to have low representation in MA programmes[21], although diversity has been increasing at national level. MA starts self-declared as being from an ethnic minority group rose from 1.5% in December 2015 to 1.7% in December 2016[22], from an estimated population in Scotland of 6.4%.

In Fife, MA starts who self-identify being from a Mixed or Multiple; Asian; African; Caribbean or Black; and Other ethnic group is 0.6%, a noticeably lower than the estimated population of 2.4%.

Table 169 MA starts in Fife 2016-2017

Source: SDS (2017) Fife Equality Summary  (18 July 2017)

Work

Demography

Analysis of the 2011 Census showed that in Scotland, Polish people had the highest rates of work at 86%, while the least likely were Arab (45%), Gypsy/Travellers, Arab and Chinese people were the least likely to be in work (noting that those groups include high proportions of students). African people were most likely to be unemployed (15%), followed by Caribbean or Black people (11%) and Gypsy/Travellers (9%)[23]. Further differences in employment based on people’s religion intersect with race and are enduring – for instance BME Muslims in the UK tend to experience the worst outcomes in terms of career development[24].

Total economically active Employee: Full-time Employee: Part-time Self-employed: Full- time  Self-employed: Part- time
White: Polish 86% 56% 18% 4% 2%
Caribbean or Black 70% 38% 15% 4% 2%
Indian 70% 40% 15% 7% 2%
African 70% 33% 17% 3% 1%
White: Other White 68% 40% 14% 6% 3%
Mixed or Multiple 66% 35% 16% 5% 3%
Bangladeshi 65% 24% 25% 6% 3%
White: Other British 64% 37% 13% 6% 3%
All 63% 36% 14% 5% 2%
Other ethnic group 63% 30% 15% 8% 3%
White: Scottish 62% 36% 14% 5% 2%
White: Irish 62% 38% 12% 6% 2%
Other Asian 60% 31% 16% 4% 2%
Pakistani 58% 21% 16% 10% 4%
White: Gypsy/Traveller 49% 20% 10% 7% 3%
Chinese 47% 22% 12% 6% 2%
Arab 45% 22% 9% 4% 2%

Table 170 Ethnic Group by Economic Activity (active), All People (16 years+)

Total economically active  Unemployed  Long-term sick or Disabled  Looking after home or family  Other Retired Student
White: Polish 86% 5% 1% 4% 2% 2% 5%
Caribbean or Black 70% 11% 4% 4% 4% 7% 11%
Indian 70% 6% 2% 6% 3% 6% 14%
African 70% 15% 2% 4% 5% 2% 18%
White: Other White 68% 6% 1% 4% 2% 7% 17%
Mixed or Multiple 66% 8% 3% 4% 2% 5% 19%
Bangladeshi 65% 8% 3% 10% 5% 5% 12%
White: Other British 64% 4% 3% 3% 1% 23% 6%
All 63% 5% 5% 3% 2% 22% 5%
Other ethnic group 63% 8% 3% 8% 5% 5% 16%
White: Scottish 62% 5% 5% 3% 2% 24% 4%
White: Irish 62% 4% 4% 2% 1% 23% 8%
Other Asian 60% 6% 1% 8% 4% 3% 23%
Pakistani 58% 7% 5% 13% 6% 7% 12%
White: Gypsy/Traveller 49% 9% 15% 11% 8% 10% 7%
Chinese 47% 6% 1% 5% 3% 6% 38%
Arab 45% 8% 2% 10% 4% 4% 35%

Table 171 Ethnic Group by Economic Activity (inactive), All People (16 years+)

Source: Analysis of Equality Results from the 2011 Census – Part 2. (26 March 2015)

Workplace culture and barriers

The Business in the Community / YouGov Race at Work 2015 report and derived research[25] give a detailed breakdown of barriers in career progression faced by minority ethnic groups in the workplace across the UK. While on average across all employees, one in five people are unhappy or frustrated with career progression, this is reported as high as 49% and 47% of people from Other Asian and Other Black backgrounds.

Figure 57 Dissatisfaction with work progression, across race/ethnicity

Source: Race at Work 2015 – Key findings Slide 13

Employment rate

From a ONS FOI request in 2016[26], if was shown that at national level, ethnic minority groups tend to have a lower employment rate that white ethnic groups (59.2% vs 73.5%) and that the 16+ unemployment rate is slightly higher (8.7% vs 5.6%). There is a marked gender pattern with 71% of white females employed, compared to 44.4% of ethnic minority females:

Aged 16-64 employment rate: numerator denominator % conf
white 2,377,100 3,233,200 73.5 0.9
ethnic minority 92,300 156,000 59.2 6.0
white males 1,205,900 1,582,800 76.2 1.3
ethnic minority males 55,400 72,800 76.1 7.7
white females 1,171,200 1,650,300 71.0 1.3
ethnic minority females 36,900 83,300 44.4 8.2

 

16+ unemployment rate: numerator denominator % conf
white 144,400 2,600,700 5.6 0.5
ethnic minority 8,900 102,200 8.7 4.1
white males 86,000 1,340,600 6.4 0.8
ethnic minority males 2,700 58,400 4.6 4.1
white females 58,400 1,260,000 4.6 0.7
ethnic minority females 6,200 43,800 14.2 7.6

 

Aged 16-64 who are economically inactive numerator denominator % conf
white 713,000 3,233,200 22.1 0.9
ethnic minority 54,800 156,000 35.1 5.8
white males 291,700 1,582,800 18.4 1.2
ethnic minority males 14,700 72,800 20.2 7.2
white females 421,300 1,650,300 25.5 1.3
ethnic minority females 40,100 83,300 48.2 8.2

Source: ONS (2016) FOI – Employment Rates by Ethnicity, Gender and Age Group

Employment rate statistics for ethnic minorities in the Mid Scotland and Fife region show a fall of -13% in the period 2015 to 2016 which was the highest change across Scotland. This is then followed by a fall of -3.1% in 2016-2017 to 53.1%.

  2015 2016 2017 Change over year
Geography
(Residence Based)
Rate (%) Level Rate (%) Level Rate (%) Level Rate (%pts) Level
Scotland 58.9 85,200 57.7 98,700 60.6 108,000 2.9 9,300
Mid Scotland and Fife 69.4 8,100 56.3 7,900 53.1 5,400 -3.1 -2,500
Glasgow City 52.4 27,400 47.0 25,300 50.9 33,500 4.0 8,200
Lanarkshire 65.8 7,400 75.1 8,500 57.3 5,500 -17.8 -3,100

Table 172 Regional Employment Patterns in Fife and Scotland

Source: Statistics from the Annual Population Survey 2017 [22 May 2018]

Forced labour and trafficking

Exploitation cases have risen by +21% across the UK between 2017Q4 and 2018Q1, but it remains quite low nationally with just over 3%[27] of all UK referrals to the NRM being sent to Police Scotland. There are no precise figures for possible levels in Fife. Nationally, we know that exploitation mainly affects adults, and mainly concerns labour exploitation (27 out of 53 cases).

Adult / Minor (Exploited as) Location of Claimed Exploitation 2018 Q1 Total 2017 Q4
UK UK and Overseas Overseas Not Known  
Adult 23 6 6 10 45 46  
Minor 6 0 0 2 8 12  
Total 29 6 6 12 53 58  

Figure 58 Number of exploitation cases across age groups, Scotland

The 53 referrals were comprised of 18 females (34%) and 35 males (66%). There were 45 (85%) individuals referred for adult exploitation categories and 8 (15%) referred for exploitation whilst a minor. Victims from Vietnam and China constituted just under half (26 out of 53) cases.

  Adult (Exploited as) Adult Total Minor (Exploited As) Minor Total 2018 Q1 Total
Claimed Nationality Domestic Servitude Labour Exploitation Sexual Exploitation Unknown Exploitation Labour Exploitation Sexual Exploitation Unknown Exploitation  
Vietnam 2 5 2 1 10 6 0 0 6 16  
China 0 8 0 2 10 0 0 0 0 10  
India 0 5 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 5  
Nigeria 0 1 3 0 4 0 0 0 0 4  
Pakistan 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3  
Romania 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 3  
Namibia 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2  
Albania 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Bangladesh 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Bulgaria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1  
Egypt 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Poland 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Somalia 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Sri Lanka 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Sudan 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Syria 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Zimbabwe 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1  
Total 2 27 12 4 45 6 1 1 8 53  

Table 173 Nationalities of exploited adults and minor

However, gender patterns for types of exploitation are evident with 10 out 18 cases (55.5%) for females related to sexual orientation and 24 out of 35 cases for females related to labour exploitation (68.6%).

Locations Female Total All cases Q1 2018l
UK UK and Overseas Overseas Not Known
Adult – Domestic Servitude 0 0 0 0 0 2
Adult – Labour Exploitation 0 1 0 2 3 27
Adult – Sexual Exploitation 5 1 1 3 10 12
Adult – Unknown Exploitation 0 0 1 1 2 4
Minor – Labour Exploitation 0 0 0 1 1 6
Minor – Sexual Exploitation 1 0 0 0 1 1
Minor – Unknown Exploitation 0 0 0 1 1 1
Total 6 2 2 8 18 53

Table 174 Claimed Exploitation Type, for females, Scotland

Locations Male Total All cases Q1 2018
UK UK and Overseas Overseas Not Known
Adult – Domestic Servitude 2 0 0 0 2 2
Adult – Labour Exploitation 15 4 3 2 24 27
Adult – Sexual Exploitation 1 0 1 0 2 12
Adult – Unknown Exploitation 0 0 0 2 2 4
Minor – Labour Exploitation 5 0 0 0 5 6
Minor – Sexual Exploitation 0 0 0 0 0 1
Minor – Unknown Exploitation 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total 23 4 4 4 35 53

Table 175 Claimed Exploitation Type, for males, Scotland

Source: National Crime Agency (10 May 2018) National Referral Mechanism Statistics 

Living Standards

Poverty

Data for Scotland shows that people from minority ethnic groups are more likely to be in poverty, both before (30% vs 15%) and after housing costs (35% vs 18%), compared to those from the ‘White – British’ group for combined data from 2013/14 to 2015/16[28].

Figure 59 Poverty across ethnicity, Scotland

Source: Scottish Government (9 Jun 2017) Poverty equality analysis

There is no further breakdown of poverty in relation to ethnicity available at local level, however the ONS 2016 FOI on employment rates[29] can provide an alternative appraisal of barriers to economic faced by those groups.

Housing

There are similar patterns across Fife and Scotland, with the majority (86%) of owner and social sector occupiers being White Scottish. Private tenants are mainly ‘white other british’, ‘white other’, ‘white polish’; ‘asian’ or from other ethnic groups:

  Owner Occupier Social sector Private rent Other All
Fife 2017          
White Scottish 86 86 56 * 82
White other British 12 12 21 * 13
White other 0 1 8 * 1
White Polish 1 7 * 1
Any Mixed or Multiple Ethnic Groups *
Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British 1 1 6 * 1
African, Caribbean or Black 0 1 * 0
Other Ethnic Group 1 1 2 * 1
Don’t know *
Refused *
Scotland 2017          
White Scottish 81 86 58 67 78
White other British 12 7 15 17 12
White other 2 2 12 10 4
White Polish 1 2 5 2 2
Any Mixed or Multiple Ethnic Groups 0 0 0 1 0
Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British 2 1 6 0 3
African, Caribbean or Black 0 1 1 1 1
Other Ethnic Group 1 1 2 2 1
Don’t know
Refused 0 0 0

Table 176 Ethnicity and Housing, Fife and Scotland

Source: Scottish Household Survey (12 December 2018) – Annual Report 2017 Table 3.4

Homelessness

Across Scotland, the proportion of applications under the Homeless Persons legislation what were from the White Scottish ethnicity has been decreasing, being at 77.7% in the 2016-2017 period. The White Other British ethnic group is the main other group, rising to 6.3%. 4.2% of applicants’ ethnicity was unknown or refused to answer. There is no detailed breakdown for 2017 available at this time.

Household type 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
A: White: Scottish 80.2% 78.8% 78.4% 77.7%
A: White: Other British 5.5% 5.6% 5.7% 6.3%
A: White: Irish 0.4% 0.4% 0.3% 0.4%
A: White: Other 3.8% 3.1% 2.8% 2.6%
White: Polish 1.4% 1.7% 1.9% 1.7%
D: African 1.1% 1.0% 1.3% 1.3%
E: Caribbean or Black 0.4% 0.5% 0.4% 0.5%
C: Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British 1.4% 1.2% 1.1% 1.3%
B: Mixed or multiple ethnic groups 0.2% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2%
F: Other ethnic group 2.4% 3.9% 4.2% 3.8%
G: Not known or Refused 3.2% 3.5% 3.7% 4.2%

Table 177 Ethnicity of housing applicants, Scotland

Source: Scottish Household Survey (2016) 8b

Health

Minority ethnic groups tend to record a lower proportion of people with a health problem or disability than the national figure (20%). For people who identified as White Gypsy/Traveller, 16% were limited a lot and 10% were limited a little due a long-term health condition or disability. Only 5% of people who identified as White Polish reported a health problem or disability, however it is worth considering that this group is of a younger age profile.

Limited a lot Limited a little Not limited
All 10% 10% 80%
White: Scottish 10% 10% 79%
White: Other British 8% 11% 81%
White: Irish 10% 10% 80%
White: Gypsy/Traveller 16% 12% 72%
White: Polish 2% 3% 95%
White: Other 3% 5% 91%
Mixed or multiple ethnic groups 4% 5% 91%

Source: Analysis of Equality Results from the 2011 Census

Chart 1.30: Ethnic Group by Long-term Health Problem

Limited a lot Limited a little Not limited
All 10% 10% 80%
Pakistani 7% 8% 86%
Indian 3% 4% 92%
Bangladeshi 5% 6% 89%
Chinese 2% 4% 94%
Other Asian 2% 4% 93%
African 2% 4% 94%
Caribbean or Black 6% 6% 88%
Arab 3% 5% 91%
Other Ethnic Group 5% 7% 89%

Source: Analysis of Equality Results from the 2011 Census

Chart 1.30: Ethnic Group by Long-term Health Problem

Justice and Personal Security

Hate crime

Racial crime remains the most commonly reported hate crime. There were 3,249 charges reported in 2017-18. This continues the downward trend since a peak of 4,547 charges reported in 2011-12, and is the lowest annual total since consistent figures became available in 2003-04.

Figure 60 Trends in Hate Crime, Scotland

Source: COPFS (2017) Hate Crime in Scotland 2017-2018

In total 3,249 charges relating to race crime were reported in 2017-18, a decrease of 4% compared to 2016-17. This is 29% lower than the peak in such charges in 2011-12, when 4,547 charges were reported. It is also the lowest annual figure since consistent figures became available in 2003-04.

Court proceedings were commenced in respect of 84% of charges in 2017-18. In total, 91% of charges reported in 2017-18 led to court proceedings (including those not separately prosecuted[30], but which may have been incorporated into other charges for the same accused which were prosecuted). No action was taken in respect of 3% of charges.

 
Year 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18
Total number of charges of race crimes 4178 4547 4034 4160 3820 3721 3367 3249
Of which  
  Charges related to racially aggravated harassment and behaviour 62% 61% 59% 55% 52% 47% 43% 42%
Charges related to another offence with a racial aggravation 38% 39% 41% 45% 48% 53% 57% 58%
Decision on how charge will proceed
  Court proceedings 84% 82% 83% 87% 86% 86% 84% 84%
Not separately prosecuted 9% 8% 9% 6% 7% 7% 8% 8%
Direct measures 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 3% 3%
Referred to Children’s Reporter 1% 2% 2% 1% 2% 1% 1% 2%
No action 5% 7% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3%
Awaiting decision 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1%

Table 178 Race crime Charges reported, 2010-11 to 2017-18 (percentages)

Source: COPFS (2017) Hate Crime in Scotland 2017-2018 p7

In Fife, partial data shows that there were 202 charges reported for racially aggravated crime (83 in Dunfermline, 119 in Kirkcaldy) in 2017-2018, increasing from the previous year (190). Across Scotland this has decreased from the highest in 2011 (4547) to 3,249 in 2017. 

  Financial Year Reported
Office 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
Dunfermline 68 74 57 81 84 107 73 83
Kirkcaldy 90 122 94 121 125 128 117 119
Scotland 4,178 4,547 4,034 4,160 3,820 3,721 3,367 3,249

Table 179 Charges reported – Racially aggravated crime, Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Scotland

Charges reported, 2010-11 to 2017-18, by Procurator Fiscal Office Table 5

People convicted and aggravations

Across Scotland, in 2016-2017, 12,252 people were convicted with aggravations, the majority of which (10,830) were on charges of domestic aggravators. The number of people convicted with racial aggravations diminished in 2016-2017 by 5%.

  2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 % change 2015-16 to 2016-17
Male and Female        
All aggravators 13,751 13,828 12,252 -11%
Domestic 12,441 12,376 10,830 -12%
Racial 701 761 721 -5%
Religious 241 247 277 12%
Sexual orientation 320 369 356 -4%
Disability 40 68 54 -21%
Transgender 8 7 14 100%

 

  2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 % change 2015-16 to 2016-17
Male        
All aggravators   11,884   11,980   10,689 -11%
   
Domestic 10,796 10,741 9,501 -12%
Racial 573 633 588 -7%
Religious 213 230 258 12%
Sexual orientation 265 316 290 -8%
Disability 33 55 41 -25%
Transgender 4 5 11 120%

 

  2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 % change 2015-16 to 2016-17
Female        
All aggravators 1,867 1,848 1,563 -15%
   
Domestic 1,645 1,635 1,329 -19%
Racial 128 128 133 4%
Religious 28 17 19 12%
Sexual orientation 55 53 66 25%
Disability 7 13 13 0%
Transgender 4 2 3 50%

Table 180 People convicted with an aggravator recorded against the main charge by gender

Source: Criminal Proceedings in Scotland 2016-17 (27 February 2018)

Detention and Conditions of detention

Scotland Census 2011 shows similar ethnicity distribution in prisons as among the general population, with a slight variation in Asian or Black ethnicities. In 2011, 2.5% of the general population was from an Asian ethnicity and 1.7% of the prison population were reported as Asian. Black ethnicities accounted for 0.6% of the general population and 1.4% of the prison population.

Figure 61 Prisoner Ethnicity In Scotland, 2013

Source: UK Prison Population Statistics
Parliament UK Number SN/SG/04334, 20 April 2017

Forced Marriages

In Scotland, the Forced Marriage etc (Protection and Jurisdiction) (Scotland) Act 2011 came into force on 28 November 2011 and provides civil protection in the form of Forced Marriage Protection Orders (FMPO) for those at risk of forced marriage as well as those already in forced marriages. Breaching a FMPO is a criminal offence in Scotland, under section 122 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (which will be referred to, for brevity, as ‘the 2014 Act’), and came into force on 30th September 2014.

By January 2017 12 FMPOs have been issued in Scotland[31], no further breakdown of data at local level was available at this time, however the research carried between 2011 and 2014 based on 191 cases of forced marriage can help draw some conclusions.

Cases in that period tended to involve young, female South Asian victims being threatened or coerced into marriage largely by their parents and extended families. The areas survey did not include Fife but incidence locally can be expected to lie be between Edinburgh’s (with the highest proportion of cases at 39%) and Dundee (2%) due to proximity and size of population.

  2011 2012 2013 2014 Total*
Aberdeen City 4 (10%) 4 (10%) 4 (8%) 5 (9%) 17 (9%)
Dundee 2 (5%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 1 (2%) 3 (2%)
East Renfrewshire 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Edinburgh 16 (38%) 17 (41%) 25 (48%) 17 (4%) 75 (39%)
Glasgow City 17 (40%) 20 (49%) 17 (33%) 18 (32%) 72 (38%)
Highlands 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
National sample 3 (7%) 0 (0%) 6 (12%) 15 (27%) 24 (13%)
Total* 42 (100%) 41 (100%) 52 (100%) 56 (100%) 191 (100%)

Table 181 Cases of forced marriages reported by study year and area

Source: Scottish Government (2017) Understanding forced marriage in Scotland Table 2

Of the cases where age was known, the majority of victims were aged 18-25, with under 18s representing around a quarter of cases and under 16s around 1 in 10 of cases. Victims were mainly from Pakistani backgrounds (more than half of cases where ethnicity was known), followed by ‘other ethnicity’, Indian and Black African.

Ethnicity White Black African Black Carib-bean Other Black Pakistani Bangladeshi Indian Other Asian Mixed race Other
Count /

(%)

4 (3%) 11 (8%) 0

(0%)

0 (0%) 79 (

55%)

7

(5%)

13 (9%) 8 (6%) 1 (1%) 20 (14%)

 

Age group Under 16 16-17 years 18-21 years 22-25 years 26-30 years 31+ years
(%) 14

(11%)

18

(14%)

36

(27%)

38

(29%)

19

(14%)

8

(6%)

Table 182 Forced marriage victim demographics

Source: Scottish Government (2017) Understanding forced marriage in Scotland
Table 3

Participation

Political and civic participation and representation

In the UK in 2017, 8% of members of the House of Commons and the House of Lords are from an ethnic minority background. This compares with 13.6% of UK population. The share of non-white population is the most proportionally represented in the Civil Service (11.6%), with the NHS at the largest share of ethnic minority staff (18%)[32].

Across Scotland, the proportion of applications to Public Appointments from people who declared they were from a minority ethnic background in 2016 was slightly higher than in the preceding years at 5.5%, this has increased yearly from a figure of 3.5% in 2012.

The proportion of those appointed who belong to the minority ethnic groups fell from 5.2% in 2015 to 1.0% in 2016, there is no further local breakdown available at this time (Public Appointments in Scotland 2016 Diversity Analysis Report – March 2017).

Social and community cohesion

There is not enough data to determine strength of feeling of belonging to community for each ethnicity in Fife at this time (SHS 2016) but national figures are available. 23% people from minority ethnic groups rate ‘Very Strongly’ the strength of belonging community, compared to 35% overall. With 44% of this group rating belonging as ‘Fairly Strongly’, this is consistent with the overall population profile. Of note in Fife is that most people rate belonging to the local community ‘Fairly’ strongly, and much less ‘Very Strongly’:

  Very strongly Fairly strongly Not very strongly Not all strongly Don’t know
Fife 2017          
Ethnicity          
White 28 51 16 4 1
Minority ethnic groups * * *
All 28 52 16 4 1
Scotland 2017          
Ethnicity          
White 35 44 15 5 1
Minority ethnic groups 23 40 26 6 5
All 35 43 16 5 1

Table 183 Strength of feeling of belonging to community

Source: Scottish Household Survey 2017 (12 Dec 2018) LA Tables 4.17

[1]  EHRC (March 2017) Equality Act 2010 – Handbook for Advisors [Scotland] p8

[2] Scottish Government (2016) Race Equality Framework for Scotland 2016-2030.

[3] NRS Population by Country of Birth and Nationality, Scotland, 2017 (24 May 2018)

[4] Scottish Government SSCQ (2016)

[5] ‘White: Other’ includes ‘White: Irish’, ‘White: Gypsy/Traveller’ and ‘White: Other White Ethnic Group’

[6] ‘Asian’ includes the categories Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British

[7] ‘All other ethnic groups’ includes categories within the ‘Mixed or Multiple Ethnic Group’, ‘African’, ‘Caribbean or Black’, and ‘Other Ethnic Group’ sections

[8] Fife Council Information and Statistics on Equality Groups in Fife 2016

[9] Home Office – Immigration statistics quarterly release

[10] EHRiC (2017) Hidden Lives – New Beginnings: Destitution, asylum and insecure immigration status in Scotland, 3rd Report (Session 5)

[11] Home Office (2017) VPRS

[12] Fife Syrian Refugee Resettlement Group (2018)

[13] All information in this section from  Scotland’s Census 2011

[14] Percentage of those with known background. Minority ethnic group includes all categories other than White-Scottish, White Other British and White-Other

[15] White-Other includes White-Gypsy/Traveller, White-Other, White Polish and White-Irish

[16] Gypsy/Travellers in Scotland – A Comprehensive Analysis of the 2011 Census

[17] Scottish Government (2017) Race Equality Framework – Sections 3 & 4

[18] Scottish Government (2017) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – Education and Training Strategy for Scotland

[19] Fife College Mainstreaming report (April 2017) p12

[20] EHRC (18 August 2016) Healing a divided Britain. https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/race-report-healing-divided-britain

[21] Equal Opportunities Committee Removing Barriers: race, ethnicity and employment. EHRiC (28th January 2016) SP Paper 890 1st Report, 2016 (Session 4)

[22] SDS (18 July 2017) Equality action plan – Year 1 update: For Modern Apprenticeships in Scotland

[23] Scottish Government (2015), ‘Analysis of Equality Results from the 2011 Census – Part 2’. http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2015/03/8716/0

[24] EHRC 2015 ‘Is Britain Fairer?’

[25] BITC (2015) Equality, Diversity and Racism in the Workplace: A Qualitative Analysis of the 2015 Race at

Work Survey

[26] ONS 27 September 2016 Employment Rates by Ethnicity, Gender and Age Group

[27] NRM 2018 Statistics

[28] Scottish Government – Evidence Finder: Income & Poverty

[29] ONS 27 September 2016 Employment Rates by Ethnicity, Gender and Age Group

[30] See note 7 of the Annex for the definition of charges not separately prosecuted.

[31]Scottish Government (2017) Understanding forced marriage in Scotland

[32] House of Commons Library (2017) Ethnic Minorities in Politics and Public life