BREXIT: Fife Consultation Summary Report September 2017

Executive Summary

The following report outlines the process and findings Fife Centre for Equalities took to collect concerns that Brexit may have on communities on behalf of Fife Council.

It was agreed we would seek the opinions of 60 residents of Fife through who were concerned or wishing to share their views about Brexit. The conversations began in June 2017 and were themed around:

  • Education
  • Employment/business
  • Welfare/Benefits
  • Right to remain
  • Hate crime
  • Any other concerns

This summary report contains an overview of the detailed consultation data provided and identification of key themes and concerns. We identified the concerns below to be recurring and shared across interviewees:

  • Education: the lessening of educational and career outcomes and opportunities for future generations.
  • Economy: the negative impacts of losing low-paid EU workers staff and the European financial assistance to farming communities.
  • Welfare: No direct links were drawn between Brexit and financial risk, those were instead associated with the wider Welfare Reform agenda that is seen to impact both UK as well as EU nationals.
  • Hate crime / Hate incidents: concerns about hate / racist speech content becoming more prevalent (i.e. everyday conversations, as well as media/news stories), mainly as islamophobia rather than anti-EU / Brexit related; but otherwise no changes in perception in hate crimes

See below the full report – or click here to download a PDF.

Continue reading “BREXIT: Fife Consultation Summary Report September 2017”

Diversity Week 2017: Open Data Workshop Evaluation Report

Diversity Week 2017: Open Data Workshop Evaluation Report

The Diversity Week Open Data Workshop was an information and dissemination workshop covering a range of topics (Click here for a PDF of this report):

  • Open Government Pioneers project in Scotland
  • Open Government Network local and informal meetups
  • Open Gov principles
  • Open Gov in practice: Participatory Budgeting
  • Development of a 3rd sector Open Data pilot

The core aim of the workshop was to explore how transparency in public equality data can be used for improving services and also for fostering a culture of social entrepreneurship.

Key points

  • Link up with the Scotland-wide OGP
  • Proposal for topic in FCE Equality Research conference 2018
  • Follow-up commitment for a 3rd sector / social innovation group to meet quarterly

Impact

  • Contribution to Strategic Outcome 2: Individuals and groups feel better connected and are able to contribute to public policy and the planning and delivery of local services.
  • Contribution to Strategic Outcome 3: Groups, whether already established or just getting started, have the tools they need to engage with their local community in a positive and inclusive way.
  • Contribution to Strategic Outcome 4: Third, public and private sector organisations demonstrate best practice in equality, diversity and inclusion.
  • Contribution to Strategic Outcome 5: FCE is recognised as a centre of excellence for championing equality, diversity and social justice.

 

Programme

13:00 Introductions

13:10 Presentation 1: Open Government Pioneers (SCVO / Scottish Government)

13:40 Participatory Budgeting in Leslie: (Fife Council)

14:10 Presentation 2: Open Gov in Civil Society (FCE)

14:30 Next steps: Piloting a Fife OpenGov group?

15:00 Close

Key Discussion points

Open Government Pioneers (SCVO/SG)

Presentation and overview of:

  • Scotland’s pilot status as Pioneer Tier of the Open Government Partnership.
  • Scotland’s National Action Plan commitments: Financial Transparency; Measure Scotland’s progress; Deliver a Fairer Scotland; Participatory Budgeting, and; Increasing Participation.

Videos:

5 Years of OGP

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ab_oi-NJGJo

Participatory budgeting (PB) (Fife Council CLD)

  • PB is used as a tool for community engagement, linked to the objectives of the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 to increase participation in decision making.
  • Participatory Budgeting in Fife has been running in different forms since 2010 (see attached document), with the PB in Leslie project being the most recent. Results of the exercise as well as a report about the process will be published by Fife Council CLD after the end of September 2017.
  • Other discussions points included the community learning element (i.e. capacity of various communities to evaluate and decide for the wider benefits) as well as participation (i.e. how to engage the most disengaged communities in the decision making, instead of defaulting to ‘who turns up at the vote’)

Open Gov in Civil Society / Open Data for Equality (FCE)

The discussion covered:

  • The Open Gov and Open Data initiatives as part of a wider transparency movement (including Freedom of Information / Freedom of Speech / Freedom of Association)
  • The issues in linking the Scotland wide OGP partnership and network and making this relevant to communities in Fife
  • How and why create open data to be used at a local level

Presentation available online at:
https://www.slideshare.net/secret/fJQl3fiYpyR2H

Next steps:

  • FCE will pilot a localised report based on EHRC’s new Equality Measurement Framework using an open platform
  • Agreed to pursue future discussions with third sector data interested parties (FVA, FCE, SCVO, St Andrews university TRSF) on developing resources and sharing learning in implementation

Participants and evaluation

7 people attended this workshop representing the following organisations.

  • Fife Council CLD
  • Fife Voluntary Action
  • Fife Centre for Equalities
  • Beside the Norm Podcast
  • People First

The participants found the event “interesting” in majority, followed by “informative” and with discussions being “good”. The main outcome was to create a platform for more people to get involved in developing an open government movement that works for voluntary, third sector and civil society groups.

Comments / quotes:

“Was good to have a small group to be able to discuss a bit more what is relevant to us”

“I liked finding out what it’s actually is about. Big words like Participatory Budgeting and Open Government just put me off. I got a better idea now what people are trying to do with PB etc”

“Had no idea there was all these groups across Scotland”

Keywords

#opengov #opendata #participatorybudgeting  #eqdata

Further Information

More information about Inclusive Communication or other equality, diversity or inclusion matters, please contact Fife Centre for Equalities by email info@centreforequalities.org.uk or telephone 01592 645 310.

Talking to Young People about Equality

 

Talking to Young People about Equality Workshop for Youth 1st Evaluation Report

Fife Centre for Equalities was invited by Youth 1st to design and deliver an evening workshop for their members ( you can also click  this link to download the report)

Contributions to FCE Strategic Plan

Strategic Outcomes:

  • Strategic Outcome 3: Groups, whether already established or just getting started, have the tools they need to engage with their local community in a positive and inclusive way.

Key Actions:

  • Promote, deliver and evaluate a range of training opportunities involving internal staff and external partners.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Better knowledge of Equality Act 2010;
  • Better appreciation of a person-centred approach;
  • Being more confident in talking to young people about equality and inclusion;
  • Being more creative in engaging and integrating with people of different protected characteristics as part of governance, a workforce or as customers/users.

Programme

18:00           Welcome and Expectations

18:15           My precious

18:30           Flag Game

18:40           Equality Quiz

19:00           Comfort break

19:15           Discussion cards

20:00           Equality Act 2010 – how is this relevant to me?

20:30           Personal actions

20:45           Evaluation

21:00           End of Session

Participants

Nine people attended this workshop on 06 September 2017.

The participants’ age range spanned from 19 to 66.  Seven of the participants are female and two are male.

No participant stated that they have a disability.

Eight participants self-classified as White Scottish.

Seven of the participants stated they have no religion, and two stated Church of Scotland.

Eight participants stated that they are Heterosexual/Straight and one as Bisexual.

Two participants have caring responsibilities.

One participant is married, two are divorced/separated and six are single.

Two of the participants are employed full-time, two in part-time employment, two are in further/higher education, two are unemployed and seeking work and one is retired.

Feedback

All nine participants scored the workshop 5 out of 5 for information being helpful, information being presented clearly, queries being answered sufficiently, and workshop being totally accessible 5.

Participants were asked to score their own knowledge before and after the workshop.  Prior to the workshop, one participant scored their own knowledge at 5 out of 5, three at 4, one at 3, two at 2 and two at 1.

After the workshop, all nine participants scored their knowledge on the subject as 5 out of 5.  This marked a significant of improvement of their knowledge as a result of this workshop.

Other Comments:

“Very useful & enjoyable course.  Will recommend to colleagues / other volunteers!”

“Great workshop, a lot of fun.”

Advice and Suggestions for future seminars/training programmes:

“Very good balance of interactive activities & presentations.”

“More time to discuss issues.”

“Any available”

Keywords

#workshop #equality #organisationaldevelopment #workforcedevelopment #YoungPeople #YouthWork #Inclusion

Further Information

More information about workforce development training or other equality, diversity or inclusion matters, please contact Fife Centre for Equalities by email info@centreforequalities.org.uk or telephone 01592 645 310.

Fife Centre for Equalities aims to build a collective voice to champion equality, diversity, inclusion and social justice across Fife and beyond.

 

Police Scotland’s Community Reassurance Message

Message from Shaheen Baber, Chief Inspector

POLICE SCOTLAND – MESSAGE TO COMMUNITIES – 16TH SEPTEMBER 2017

Police Scotland stands with our colleagues and communities in London following the incident on Friday 15th September 2017. Our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected and we will continue to provide assistance to the Metropolitan Police Service as required.

 

Following the incident, the UK threat level has been raised to critical (an attack is expected imminently). There is no specific information however to suggest an increase risk to Scotland and we ask the public to go about their business as normal, remaining alert but not alarmed.

 

In response to the raised threat level, Police Scotland has increased operations to protect the people of Scotland, businesses and public places. This includes increasing the number of armed officers on patrol, across the country.

 

Communities should not be alarmed by the presence of these armed officers as the measures are being taken to allow the public to go about their daily lives as normal.

 

Police Scotland will be reviewing all significant events taking place over the next few days and may increase the security footprint if deemed appropriate. Communities should be assured that Police Scotland, along with its partners, has well-rehearsed plans to respond to any major incident.

 

Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins said: “Terrorists want to create discord, distrust and fear. The police stand together with all communities in the UK and we will take action against any criminal behaviour, which seeks to undermine society, especially where crimes are motivated by hate. Communities defeat terrorism, which is why we must maintain the strong relationship we have between the public and the police.”

 

Whilst such events are clearly upsetting, we would urge each and every member of our communities to remain united against extremism and hate.  Police Scotland will not tolerate any attempts to target any community by individuals or groups and we continue to work with all of our partners to resolve issues and address concerns.

 

Should anyone become a victim of, or witness to, any hate crime, they should contact the police and report the incident. Visit the Police Scotland internet site for more information: www.scotland.police.uk and click on the ‘Report Hate Crime’ link.

KEEP SAFE ADVICE

While there is no specific information to suggest an increase risk to Scotland, we will take this opportunity to remind you of the following safety advice:

PUBLIC VIGILANCE

 

  • Remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity to the police by telephoning 101, or in an emergency always dial 999. The confidential Anti-Terrorist Hotline can also be contacted by telephoning 0800 789321.

 

  • Look out for and report any suspicious activity. Suspicious activity is anything that seems out of place, unusual or just doesn’t seem to fit in with day-to-day life. It may be nothing, but if you see or hear anything that could be terrorist related trust your instincts and call us.

All information passed to the police through the Anti-Terrorist Hotline is treated in the strictest of confidence. It is thoroughly analysed and researched by experienced officers before, and if, any police action is taken.

 

For further information about keeping safe, visit the Police Scotland internet site: www.scotland.police.uk/keep-safe.

(Click here  to download the original letter to communities by CI Shaheen Baber).

We here at Fife Centre for Equalities would also like to make a statement about the horrific events that took place in London:

We are all deeply saddened by the attack that took place in Parsons Green’s, London on Friday 15th September 2017. We also want to promote a message of unity across all communities in the wake of these distressing events.  We support Police Scotland by asking you to remain calm and untied against extremism and hate.  If you need to speak to someone, please feel free to contact us at FCE.”

A Proud Partnership in Action

Fife Centre for Equalities is so proud that we and our partners have made history, collectively we brought pride to Kirkcaldy City Centre on 01 July 2017. We ensured the #LGBTI communities were seen and heard by politicians, businesses, services providers and everyone else.

Continue reading “A Proud Partnership in Action”

What’s New in Adult Protection

WHAT’S NEW IN ADULT PROTECTION?
Fife Adult Protection June Newsletter and Information 

  • What did you tell us?

From September 2016 – January 2017 the Adult Support & Protection Committee (ASPC) ran two surveys; one on general adult protection information, and another on accessible information.

The Committee have looked at the survey results and agreed an action plan which will help determine future work.  To find out more visit:  www.fifedirect.org.uk/adultprotection and visit the ‘Adult Support & Protection Committee’ webpage.

Continue reading “What’s New in Adult Protection”

BREXIT Questionnaire

To coincide with our Brexit focus groups this week, we have launched a short online questionnaire so that we can get an insight into how Brexit is going to affect not only you but your friends, family etc. This is perfect for you if you are unable to attend one of our sessions this week!

We still have two sessions that you can pop in for this week:

Wednesday 21st June, 6:30-8:30pm

Parkgate Community Centre , Parkgate, Rosyth, KY11 2JW.

Thursday 22nd June 6pm-8pm

County Buildings , St Catherine Street, Cupar, KY15 4TA.

To book, or for more information, contact Pat by Email: pat@centreforequalities.org.uk Tel: 01592 645 310.

Brexit poster Social media posterFINAL

Police Scotland’s Message to Communities

Message from Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson

Following the incident of Monday 19 June 2017 in Finsbury Park, London, I assure you that Police Scotland remains united with all communities. Obviously this comes soon after the attacks in London and Manchester as well as other attacks abroad. Our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected.

 

While we understand that the public will clearly be appalled by these events, I would urge each and every member of our communities to remain united against extremism and hate.

 

Police Scotland will not tolerate any attempts to target any community by any misguided individual or group and will work with all of our partners to resolve any issues and address concerns. Should anyone become a victim of, or witness to, hate crime, they should contact the police and report the incident.

 

Please be assured that Police Scotland continues to work with partners at home and abroad to counter the threat from terrorism and ensure the safety and wellbeing of all our communities.

 

Please be vigilant and if you suspect something is wrong then report it to the police. If you have any concerns or information about suspicious activity please contact the Police on 101, the UK Anti-Terrorism Hotline on 0800 789 321, Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111, or in an emergency dial 999.

 

Police Scotland continues to dynamically review all safety and security plans and operations. An element of this includes ensuring our armed policing and specialist resources are appropriately deployed.

 

The UK threat level remains at Severe. We have no specific information that Scotland is at risk of attack and I would ask you to go about your business as normal, remaining alert but not alarmed. The UK Government has produced guidance which can be accessed via the following links: ‘Places of Worship Guidance’ ‘Crowded Places Booklet’. These provide sensible precautionary advice and can be distributed throughout your communities.

Thank you for your continued support in keeping our communities safe.

Nelson Telfer

Assistant Chief Constable

(Click here to down the original letter to communities by ACC Nelson Telfer).

We here at Fife Centre for Equalities would also like to make a statement about the horrific events Finsbury Park, London:

 

We are all deeply saddened by the attack that took place in Monday 19 June 2017 in Finsbury Park, London. We also want to promote a message of unity across all communities in the wake of these distressing events.  We support Police Scotland by asking you to remain calm and untied against extremism and hate.  If you need to speak to someone, please feel free to contact us at FCE.”

Equality and Diversity Workshop – Glenrothes High School’s Diversity Day

 

Background

Glenrothes High School hosted a half day event for S1 and S2 pupils to raise awareness about equality and diversity on the 10th of March 2017.

Fife Centre for Equalities (FCE) were invited to help plan the event and deliver workshops on the Equality Act 2010 and what it means for pupils.

The pupils got to meet different groups that gave a short talk about a particular protected characteristic. The characteristics covered at the event were:

Evaluation Report of FCE Equality and Diversity Workshop

Contributions to FCE Strategic Plan:

The mission of FCE is to build a collective voice to champion equality, diversity, inclusion and social justice. We aim to provide high quality practical guidance and support to everyone here in Fife.
An event such as this gives us the opportunity to make people aware of the relevance of the Equality Act 2010 to individuals and that they can be part of making Fife a fairer and more equal place to work, live or study in.

Strategic Outcomes:

  1. Individuals feel respected, safe and have the freedom to lead a fulfilling life where they live, work or study.
  2. Third, public and private sector organisations demonstrate best practice in equality, diversity and inclusion.
  3. FCE is recognised as a centre of excellence for championing equality, diversity and social justice.

Key Actions:

  • FCE became involved in the development of this event in January 2017 where we provided a list of contacts for individuals and organisations that may want to participate in the event.
  • Supported the development of the event by participating in the planning group.
  • Developed and delivered a foundation equality and diversity workshop.

 

To download and read the full report click here

 

 

BREXIT Meetings

Come along and visit one of our many Brexit discussion sessions, with the opportunity to ask questions, share your concerns or opinions or even just for a coffee and a chat.

We will hold the sessions on:

Monday 19th June, 10:30am-12:30pm
Town House , 2 Wemyssfield, Kirkcaldy, KY1 1XW.

Wednesday 21st June, 6:30-8:30pm
Parkgate Community Centre , Parkgate, Rosyth, KY11 2JW.

Thursday 22nd June 6pm-8pm
County Buildings , St Catherine Street, Cupar, KY15 4TA.

To book, or for more information, contact Pat by Email: pat@centreforequalities.org.uk Tel: 01592 645 310. Please let us know a week in advance if you require any assistance
e.g. interpreters/BSL.

Brexit poster Social media posterFINAL

FCE Position on Equality: General Election 2017 Manifestos

A. FCE position on Equality: General Election 2017

(for a PDF of this report, click FCE GE2017 Manifesto Equality comparison – Summary)

Fife Centre for Equalities wants to see an equal society that values common goals as well as differences. We want everyone to be included no matter who they are, where they live or whether they wish to be labelled. As an independent charity, we monitor long-term and UK-wide equality trends that have been highlighted at UK/National as well as Fife-area level[i] (e.g. Equality Groups in Fife, 2016-2017).

As a follow up our General Election 2017 Equality Hustings, we build on the questions asked to candidates on the day and put also forwards the UK-wide equality issues highlighted below. We ask the representatives of all political parties to consider what policies they would put in place to protect the people of Fife as office bearers of the future UK Government in how they:

  • How to evidenceand assess the degree of fairness (or unfairness) present for different groups in society[ii]
    • For instance, the Race Equality Framework[iii] will monitor one of out of nine protected characteristics of the Equality Act that experience discrimination, prompting for a wider approach
  • How to deal with the entrenched attainment gaps in education
    • This, particularly in the case of BAME and gypsy traveller children and young people[iv]
  • How to increase fairness in recruitment, development and reward of employment across section
    • With particular focus on gender segregation and unequal pay across industry sectors[v]
  • Improving living conditionsfor community safety and cohesion
    • including how to popularise safes places[vi] across the protected characteristics and how to deal with hate crimeharassment and abuse[vii]
  • The issue of diminishing diversity in politics[viii], democratic participationas well as the access to justice following the cuts to legal aid[ix]
  • How to provide equal access to healthand care services that treats all people with dignity
  • Impact on the economy of Brexit and related changes to immigration patterns
    • Particularly as the OBR forecasted £6 billion shortfall in tax receipts due to fall in immigration to the UK by 2020-2021
  • And finally, how do we balance civil liberties and public safety in the current climate of fear of terrorism

B. Manifesto comparison: how do the parties address long-term equality issues?
Below is a comparison of how the respective manifestos directly address the equality trends, taking into account 3 or 6-yearly intervals at UK/National level (i.e. data from EHRC Is Britain Fairer / Is Scotland Fairer, 2016) and also yearly at Fife-area level (2016-2017)[x].

Please note: the comparison below does not necessarily consider topics that have featured in media and news up to including the last days of the election campaign but instead focusses on a range of long-standing issues. Also, this is comparison of how the manifesto’s pledges correlate to the EHRC’s Equality Measurement Framework and Human Rights Measurement Framework and not FCE’s position.

ge17 analysis
GE17 Manifesto comparison: how do the parties address long-term equality issues?

 

C. Breakdown by policy area

This section breakdowns trends in equality, summarising in positive trends in blue and in negative trends in red and highlights respective manifesto pledges by political party.

  1. Legal security and physical security; the right to Life
    Including: Crime, Gender-based violence, Hate crime

PROS: Homicide rates overall have fallen, as well the proportion of adults reporting as victims of violent crime, sexual and domestic violence. In terms of community safety, there has been a fall in proportion of people who feel unsafe being alone at home at night, or walking alone in the local area after dark. Confidence in the criminal justice system increased and the use of police use of stop and search has been reviewed recently reformed[xi].

CONS: Police-recorded hate crime in relation to disability and sexual orientation increased. People more likely to report feeling unsafe are women, disabled people, older people and people who had never worked or were long-term unemployed. Confidence in the criminal justice system was noticeably lower for disabled people and older people. Across the UK, overcrowding in prisons still persists. The stigma towards Gypsy/Travellers and Roma people remained, also indicated by figures in hate crime. Harassment of LGB people and ethnic minorities also continued.

 

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         Global effort to close down online spaces for those who abuse children, incite violence or propagate hate speech p38

·         National infrastructure police force, bringing together the Civil Nuclear Constabulary, the Ministry of Defence Police and the British Transport Police p44

·         Incorporate the Serious Fraud Office into the National Crime Agency p44

·         (UK) 10000 more prison spaces, however 20000 fewer UK police officers since 2010

Scottish Labour Party: ·         Support Istanbul Convention – disability hate crime and violence against disabled women reported annually with national action plans p58

·         support for the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Bill p105

·         zero tolerance approach to hate crime p107

·         new guidance for relationships and sex education that is LGBTI inclusive p108
end racism and discrimination against Gypsy/Travellers and Roma communities p109

·         sign the UNCRPD into UK law p109

·         make terminal illness a protected characteristic under the Equality Act p110
(UK) Commitment to 10 000 new police officers

Scottish National Party: ·         support for Police Scotland at current levels and increase in police numbers p5

·         tax relief for Police Scotland. (p.19)

·         Private Member’s Bill Protecting women and girls from gender-based violence p32

·         demand full devolution of equality law to the Scottish Parliament p37

·         action plan for implementation of UNCRPD p37

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         reduce intolerance, including anti-Semitism, and hate crimes alongside organisations such as Show Racism the Red Card, the Anne Frank Trust UK, and Kick It Out; tackle

the growing incidence of Islamophobic hate crime p7

·         End Police Scotland and the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service paying VAT on their purchases p49

·         Permit intercepts where justified and permit surveillance of those suspected of

serious crime p50

·         Support increase community policing (i.e. England and Wales) with additional £300m a year to local police forces, end the 1% cap on police pay rises.

 

  1. Health, Care and support
    Including: Health demographics, Mental Health, Caring Responsibility, Childcare

 

PROS: Gap in life expectancy between men and women narrowed, greater decrease in this gap in Scotland compared to England and Wales. Proportion of young people drinking once a week fell as proportion of young people smoking.

 

CONS: Life expectancy is lower for both men and women in the most deprived areas of Scotland. Lack of evidence on life expectancy for people sharing protected characteristics other than gender. Increasing proportions of women describing their health as bad or very bad. Self-reported health status worse for Gypsy/Travellers and older Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi women. Increase in the proportion of adults aged 25 to 34 at risk of poor mental health. Suicide rate is higher for men and for people living in deprivation. Little improvement in public attitudes to mental ill health.

 

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         Increase NHS budget by whichever is highest: 2%, inflation or Barnett p63

·         focus on mental health and acute problems interventions p54

·         introduce Frank’s Law and improve support for dementia sufferers under 65 p54

·         increase number of BAME organ donors to cut the long waiting times for patients from those groups and save more lives p54

·         new child bereavement leave entitlement p63

·         extend Equalities Act protections against discrimination to mental health conditions that are episodic and fluctuating p55

Scottish Labour Party: ·         health and social care professionals to receive ongoing training to understand and meet the needs of LGBTI patients and service users p108

·         end the 1 per cent pay cap p69; adopt in full UNISON’s Ethical Care Charter 70

·         Back the Frank’s Law campaign to ensure under 65s with dementia receive free care p70

·         Increase free childcare; fund a breakfast club in every primary school in Scotland p39

·         support the Scottish Association for Mental Health’s (SAMH) call for a 10-year plan for improving mental health services p72

Scottish National Party: ·         Increase NHS Scotland funding by £2 billion by end of parliament p6

·         Universality of disability payments

·         against any further privatisation of the NHS p6

·         childcare to 30 hours per week p6

·         developing and implementing the Child and Adolescent Health and Wellbeing Strategy p16

·         Mental Health Strategy including increasing the mental health workforce and improving delivery of child and adolescent mental health services p 17

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         Introducing new preventative health measures across the UK, helping people keep healthy p10

·         Scotland to receive a fair share of the receipts from a 1p increase in the income tax paid on dividends p11

·         (UK) 1p on all income tax rates to secure a £6 billion boost to secure the future of the NHS p11

·         Improve the training of frontline public service professionals and promote the roll-out of mental health champions in settings such as schools p13

·         End the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental health issues p13

·         raise the amount people can earn before losing Carer’s Allowance from £110 to £150 a week, and reduce the number of hours’ care per week required to qualify p14

·         strategy to tackle childhood obesity p14

  1. Education
    Including: Attainment, Bullying in schools

 

PROS: Educational attainment in schools improved and exclusions from school fell as well as percentages of men and women with no qualifications. The percentage of people aged 25 and over with a degree increased.

 

CONS: Gypsy/Traveller pupils still have the lowest educational attainment rates. Children from poorer backgrounds performed less well than their peers and attainment of looked after children was well below that of other pupils. Exclusion rates remained high for Gypsy/Travellers, boys, and pupils with additional support needs (ASN). The proportion of NEETs not changed over time. Bullying an issue for disabled, and lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) children and young people. Women and disabled people remained more likely to have no qualifications.

 

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         reset general education to focus on traditional subjects and core knowledge p50

·         Review the Curriculum for Excellence p50

·         separate curriculum development and inspections; create a new independent inspectorate p50

·         reforms to the one-size-fits-all model; range of government-funded but autonomous schools p50

·         Apprenticeship frameworks expanded to help access and close disparities between genders, ages, disabled people or care leavers p50

Scottish Labour Party: ·         tackle bullying of LGBTI young people by initial and ongoing training on LGBTI issues students p108

·         more money for the Scottish government to invest in arts education p93

·         bring together organisations such as sportscotland, the Scottish Sports Association and the Scottish Sports Volunteer Forum to create a Sports Volunteer Fund aimed at supporting people to go on coaching courses, child protection courses and mentoring schemes p97

·         reform the Equality Act 2010 to ensure it protects trans people; zero tolerance approach to hate crime p107

·         tackle bullying of LGBTI young people by teachers receiving initial and ongoing training on the issues students face and how to address them p108

Scottish National Party: ·         Oppose grammar schools p6

·         National Improvement Framework, the Scottish Attainment Challenge and a £120 million Pupil Equity Fund p6

·         Tuition free university p6

·         Increase childcare to 30 hours p19

·         Expand the Education Maintenance Allowance p19

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         “Penny for Education” – secure £500 million investment for education p17

·         Expand early education; expand Pupil Premium p17

·         Oppose introduction of national testing p20

·         support the need for lifelong learning p20

·         Education Scotland to be split between policy and inspection p20

·         End the 1% cap on teachers’ pay rises p25

 

 

  1. Employment and economy
    Including: Taxation, Gender Balance, Equal Pay, Exploitation, Employment rates, Modern Apprenticeships

PROS: Increased recognition of human rights violations resulting from trafficking, forced labour, servitude and exploitation
CONS: Women were less likely to be in work than men, and those women who were in work were less likely to be in senior positions or in part-time work. Age-related employment gaps widened, young people less likely to be in work. Unemployment rates increased more for disabled people than for non-disabled people and also significantly higher for BAME people compared with White people. Modern Apprenticeships showing gender segregation and low levels of access for ethnic minorities and disabled people.

 

 

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         personal allowance increase to £12,500 by 2020; threshold for the higher rate of income tax to £50,000 p16

·         tax increases not ruled out

·         improve take-up of shared parental leave and help companies provide more flexible work environments that help mothers and fathers to share parenting p54

·         Apprenticeship frameworks expanded to help access and close disparities between genders, ages, disabled people or care leavers p50

·         new integration strategy, which will seek to help people in more isolated communities to engage with the wider world, help women in particular into the workplace p53

·         extend Equalities Act protections against discrimination to mental health conditions that are episodic and fluctuating p55

·         1 million more people with disabilities into employment over the next ten years across the UK p55

Scottish Labour Party: ·         Set up a Scottish Investment Bank with £20bn for local projects and small businesses p17

·         require firms supplying national or local government to meet the high standards we should expect of all businesses: paying their taxes; recognising trade unions; respecting workers’ rights and equal opportunities; protecting the environment; providing training, and paying suppliers on time p18

·         expect suppliers to reduce boardroom pay excesses by moving towards a 20:1 gap between the highest and lowest paid p18

·         remove barriers that prevent young people, especially girls, from entering science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) p43

·         In too many sectors, opportunities are overwhelmingly filled by young men p43

·         enhance the powers and functions of EHRC, making it independent to effectively challenge discrimination; reinstate the public sector equality duties p104

·         workplace risk assessment for pregnant women mandatory so necessary adaptions can be made p106

 

 

Scottish National Party: ·         30,000 new modern apprenticeships by the end of the parliament p19

·         Abolish fees of Employment Tribunals p34

·         back Women and Equalities Committee’s recommendation to strengthen the law to protect women from discriminatory redundancies and practices p34

·         Equal pay audits should cover gender, race and disability. SNP MPs will support lowering the threshold to 150 employees, from the current level of 250 employees, and the introduction of sanctions, including fines, for employers that fail to comply with the law p34

·         public authorities with more than 20 employees to provide gender pay gap reports  every two years; equal pay statements every four years providing policies on equal pay and occupational segregation and include reporting on gender, disability and race p34

·         change in the Equality Act to strengthen and change the law that currently allows employers to have different dress codes for men and women p34

·         introduce a proper legal right to breastfeed in the workplace p35

 

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         support the need for lifelong learning p20

·         build on the forthcoming Taylor Report p29

·         scrap employment tribunal fees p29

·         ‘good employer’ kitemark covering areas such as paying a living wage, avoiding unpaid internships and using name-blind recruitment p29

·         set a genuine living wage across all sectors p29

·         create a formal right to request a fixed contract and consult on introducing a right to make regular patterns of work contractual after a period of time p29

·         Extend the Equality Act to all large companies with over 250 employees, requiring them to monitor and publish data on gender, BAME, and LGBT+ employment levels and pay gaps p47

·         Extend the use of name-blind recruitment processes in the public sector and encourage their use in the private sector; Require diversity in Public Appointments p47

·         Shortlists including at least one BAME candidate; Extend requirements on companies to strengthen responsibility for supply chains, with focus on good practice in tackling modern slavery, including training for police and prosecutors in identifying and supporting victims and implement the Ewins’ report recommendations on domestic workers p47

·         Develop a government-wide plan to tackle BAME inequalities, and review the Equality and Human Rights Commission to determine whether it is effectively fulfilling its role and whether its funding is adequate p48

·         Increase accessibility to public places and transport by making more stations wheelchair accessible, improving the legislative framework governing Blue Badges, setting up a benchmarking standard for accessible cities, and bringing

·         into effect the provisions of the 2010 Equality Act on discrimination by private hire vehicles and taxis p48

·         Outlaw caste discrimination p48

 

 

  1. Standards of living
    Including: Welfare, Pensions, Wealth inequality, Poverty & life outcomes
    Home Ownership, Housing Standards

 

PROS: Fall in the proportion of households that did not meet the Scottish Housing Quality Standard and in proportion of children living in those households. Homelessness and number of households in temporary accommodation fell.

 

CONS: Poverty closely related to poorer outcomes living conditions, overcrowding, crime in the neighbourhood. Income poverty persistent for women, ethnic minority groups and families with disabled members. Household wealth of the top 10% almost 100 times higher than the net wealth of the poorest 10%. Three-quarters of Bangladeshi children, and half of Black African children in Britain grow up in poverty. Over 1 in 4 of families with disabled people live below 60% median income: 29% of those with a disabled adult, 28% of those with a disabled child and 38% of those with both. 60% of women reaching state pension age in 2008 were entitled to less than the full basic state pension, compared to 10% of men. Average hourly pay declined in Scotland, steepest declines were for younger workers.

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         increase the National Living Wage to 60 per cent of median earnings by 2020 and then by the rate of median earnings p18

·         act to ensure that the interests of employees on traditional contracts, the self-employed and those people working in the ‘gig’ economy are protected p18

·         Give more power to the Pensions Regulator p20

·         legislate to make executive pay packages subject to strict annual votes by shareholders p20

·         United Kingdom Shared Prosperity Fund once the UK left the EU based on the Conservative’s Industrial Strategy p35

·         private landlords and businesses who deny people a service on the basis of ethnicity, religion or gender are properly investigated and prosecuted p54

·         design a Scottish disability benefits system p55

·         Replace pensions triple lock with guarantee that increases after 2020 to match inflation and average wages p62

·         Protect Winter Fuel Payments from means tests (contrasted to England & Wales) p62

·         Keep other pensioner benefits, including free bus passes and TV licences p62

·         ensure all families who lose a baby are given the bereavement support they need, including a new entitlement to child bereavement leave (contrasted to England & Wales) p62

·         100,000 additional homes over the next five years p65

Scottish Labour Party: ·         Scrap sanctions regime, bedroom tax, cuts to Bereavement Support Payment p57

·         reinstate housing benefit for under 21s p57

·         Scrap PIP assessments p58

·         Keep the pension triple lock, winter fuel allowance and free bus passes p59

·         Increase employment and support allowance by £30 per week p58

·         Increase carer’s allowance by £11 a week p58

·         oversee housebuilding programme since the war, investing to build over a million new homes p62

·         guarantee Help to Buy funding until 2027 p63

·         Introduce a real Living Wage of £10 an hour p70

·         equal pay audit requirements on large employers to close pay gap of BAME workers p109

·

Scottish National Party: ·         against means-test of disability benefits p36

·         Protect triple lock and Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI) campaign p7

·         Reversal of cuts to Employment and Support Allowance p32

·         Continued support of Child Poverty Bill; establish Poverty and Inequality Commission p32

·         Bill addressing socio-economic duty of the Equality Act p33

·         Oppose cuts in Bereavement Payments and Widowed Parents’ Allowance p33

·         Restore Housing Support for 18 to 21 y/o p33

·         Repeal Trade Union Act 2016; Ban zero hour contracts p34

·         Increase minimum wage to level of Living Wage p34

·         back the Women and Equalities Committee’s recommendation to strengthen the law to protect women from discriminatory redundancies and practices p34

 

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         build 300,000 new homes a year by 2022 p24

·         create a formal right to request a fixed contract and consult on introducing a right to make regular p29

·         patterns of work contractual after a period of time.

·         Keep the triple lock on pensions and free bus passes p39

·         Withdraw eligibility for the Winter Fuel Payment from pensioners who pay tax at the higher rate (40%) p41

·         reversing cuts to housing benefit for 18-21-year olds and increase the rates of Job Seeker’s Allowance and Universal Credit for those aged 18-24 at the same rate as minimum wages p41

·         Reverse cuts to Employment Support Allowance to those in the Work-related Activity Group p41

·         Scrap the ‘bedroom tax’ and Work Capability Assessment p41

·         Allow councils to charge 200% council tax on foreign-owned empty homes

·

 

  1. Power and voice; the Individual & society
    Including: Brexit, Immigration, Human Rights Act, UK political reform, IndyRef2

PROS: Legislation same-sex marriage introduced, Public acceptance of people who are lesbian, gay or bisexual continued to rise. Most people felt they could rely on the support of family, friends and neighbours. Small improvements to the gender balance of our elected representatives, greater gender diversity in the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly than in the UK Parliament. Increased political participation (including of young people) and an increased proportion of people perceiving that they can influence local decisions. British Sign Language (Scotland) Act was passed in 2015.

 

 

CONS: Women and ethnic minorities remain under-represented in Parliament and other political institutions. Young people display declining levels of political activity and engagement in decision-making bodies. A minority of adults aged under 25 now vote at general and devolved elections, and the proportions are falling. MPs from the General Election 2015: 29% of MPs were female, 53% over 50 years old, 6% from non-white backgrounds and one-third from fee-paying schools (vii).

 

 

Scottish Conservative and Unionists: ·         Double the Immigration Skills Charge levied on companies employing migrant workers, to £2,000 a year by the end of the parliament p23

·         no longer be members of the single market or customs union p36

·         not repeal or replace the Human Rights Act during Brexit or until 2019 p37

·         control of borders and reduction of immigration to annual net migration in the tens of thousands p48

·         oppose Scottish Referendum p30

·         No decision-making powers taken back to Westminster p33

·         Reform asylum system p40

·         retain the first past the post system of voting for parliamentary elections and extend this system to police and crime commissioner and mayoral elections; repeal the Fixed-term Parliaments Act. p43

·         retain the current franchise to vote in parliamentary elections at eighteen p43

·         reform to allow the retirement of peers and the expulsion of members for poor conduct p43

·         review the honours system p44

Scottish Labour Party: ·         scrap the Brexit White Paper and replace with emphasis on retaining single market and the customs union p28

·         seeking to stay part of Horizon 2020 p29

·         raised issues around immigration in terms of how vital migrants are to the Scottish economy p31

·         migration management systems to identify labour and skill shortages p32

·         honouring the spirit of international law and our moral obligations by taking our fair share of refugees p33

·         Protection for working migrants whatever their ethnicity or religion p32

·         end indefinite detentions, distinguish between migrant labour and family attachment, and will continue to support the work of the Forced Marriage Unit p32

·         reinstate the Migrant Impact Fund and boost it with a contributory element from the investments required for High Net Worth Individual Visas p32

·         Oppose a second independence referendum p68

·         pledged to protect the Human Rights Act p80

·         reduce the voting age to 16 p101

·         Make the second chamber at Westminster democratically elected, and end the hereditary principle p101

·         reform of internal disciplinary procedures to make them firmer and fairer, and an expansion of training to tackle anti-Semitism p109

·         appoint dedicated global ambassadors for women’s rights, LGBTI rights and religious freedom to fight discrimination and promote equality globally p114

 

Scottish National Party: ·         full reinstatement of the Post-Study Work Visa scheme p18

·         support the ERASMUS+ programme of international student exchanges p18

·         reinforce the right of the Scottish Parliament to decide when a referendum should happen p29

·         Oppose any attempts by the to scrap the Human Rights Act and withdraw the UK from the ECHR p30

·         equality law reforms to ensure same-sex couples have equal pension rights and protected characteristics are expanded to ensure all LGBTI people are fully protected from discrimination and harassment p37

·         support as possible for disabled people, and people of all classes, races and gender identities to stand for election to the House of Commons p41

·         support the EU in the pursuit of the objectives outlined in the EU Global Strategy, particularly in the cross-cutting themes of Human Rights, Women, Peace and Security and Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment p46

·         promote the rights of LGBTI people throughout the world as an integral part of UK foreign policy p47

·         urge the UK government to take action on the recommendations of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees including implementing a National Refugee Integration Strategy p47

·         urge the UK government to work with the devolved administrations, local authorities and local communities to provide services for asylum seekers p47

·

Scottish Liberal Democrats: ·         Hold a referendum on the final Brexit deal, with the option to remain in the EU p6

·         guarantee the rights of EU nationals in the UK; maintain membership of the Single Market p7

·         Support the principle of freedom of movement between the UK and EU – the right to work, travel, study and retire abroad p7

·         Introduce a Digital Bill of Rights that protects people’s powers over their own information, supports individuals over large corporations, and preserves the neutrality of the Web p48

·         End the ministerial veto on release of information under the Freedom of Information Act p48

·         Allow high-skilled immigration to support key sectors of the economy p51

·         Remove students from official migration statistics p51

·         Welcome 50,000 Syrian refugees over five years p52

·         vote against any attempts to scrap the Human Rights Act or withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights remove students from the official migration statistics p52

·         Establish a centrally-funded Migrant Impact Fund to help local communities to adjust to new migration and meet unexpected pressures on public services and housing p52

·         Offer asylum to people fleeing countries where their sexual orientation or gender identification p52

·         Champion the rules-based international order, which provides a strong basis for multilateral action to address the world’s most pernicious problems including poverty, armed conflict, disease, climate change, and the abuse of human rights including forced marriage, so-called ‘honour’ killings, and Female Genital Mutilation p55

·         Introduce votes at 16 for all elections and referendums across the UK p62

·         Introduce the Single Transferable Vote for electing MPs across the UK p62

·         Introduce legislation to allow for all-BAME and all-LGBT+ parliamentary shortlists p62

·         Oppose Scottish independence referendum p64

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

SOURCES

BBC General election 2017: Manifesto guide on where the parties stand. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2017-39955886

EHRC, Is Britain Fairer. https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/britain-fairer

EHRC, Is Scotland Fairer. https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/britain-fairer/scotland-fairer-introduction/scotland-fairer-report

National Voices’ analysis of party manifestos ahead of the 2017 General Election. http://www.nationalvoices.org.uk/publications/our-publications/general-election-2017-manifesto-analysis

Liberal Democrats Manifesto 2017: Change Britain’s Future (UK manifesto) http://www.libdems.org.uk/manifesto

Scottish Conservative and Unionist Manifesto 2017: Forward, Together http://www.scottishconservatives.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/GE2017_Manifesto_A5_Scottish_DIGITAL.pdf

Scottish Labour Party Manifesto 2017: Together we are stronger http://www.scottishlabour.org.uk/page/-/Manifesto%202017.pdf

Scottish National Party Manifesto 2017: https://www.snp.org/manifesto

 

 

Fife Centre for Equalities aims to build a collective voice to champion equality, diversity, inclusion and social justice across Fife and beyond.

 

Creative Commons License

 

This publication is released on a Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial 4.0 International License. Feel free to share it, adapt or modify it for non-commercial use, please refer to Fife Centre for Equalities as the original source.

 

If you would like to contribute or have suggestions for future changes/ additions, please do not hesitate to contact us – our publications are continually updated with new and revised information.

 

www.centreforequalities.org.uk

New Volunteer House, 16 East Fergus Place, Kirkcaldy, KY1 1XT

Fife Centre for Equalities is a Company Limited by Guarantee, registered in Scotland No. 536028

and registered Scottish Charity No. SC046683.
REFERENCES

[i] Fife Centre for Equalities – Equality Reports. https://centreforequalities.org.uk/tag/equality-reports/

[ii] Is Scotland Fairer? The state of equality and human rights 2015. https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/britain-fairer/scotland-fairer-introduction/scotland-fairer-report

[iii] Race Equality Framework for Scotland 2016-2030. Scottish Government http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2016/03/4084

[iv]Improving educational outcomes for children and young people from travelling cultures- consultation paper. Scottish Government http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/02/5914/downloads

[v] REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS IN SCOTLAND: STATISTICS FROM THE ANNUAL POPULATION SURVEY 2016 http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0051/00518423.pdf

[vi] Report of Independent Advisory Group on Hate Crime, Prejudice and Community Cohesion. Scottish Government http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0050/00506074.pdf

[vii] Information and Statistics on Equality Groups in Fife 2016 (Feb 2017). Fife Council. https://www.fifedirect.org.uk/publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=publication.pop&pubid=BAB6891C-97E4-726D-36F03FE6467CDEA9

[viii] Commons Briefing Papers: Social background of Members of Parliament 1979-2015

[ix] The implications for access to justice of the Government’s proposals to reform legal aid – Human Rights Joint Committee https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/jt201314/jtselect/jtrights/100/10004.htm

[x] Fife Centre for Equalities – Equality Reports. https://centreforequalities.org.uk/tag/equality-reports/

[xi] Code of Practice on the Exercise by Constables of Powers of Stop and Search of the Person in Scotland http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0051/00512924.pdf

 

Police Scotland’s Message to Communities

Police Scotland have released a statement in response to the terrorist attacks that gripped London this weekend:

“POLICE SCOTLAND – MESSAGE TO COMMUNITIES”

Message from Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson

Police Scotland stands with our colleagues and the communities of London following the terrorist attack on Saturday 3 June 2017. This comes soon after the attack in Manchester, and other recent attacks abroad. Our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected by these events. We will provide any assistance necessary to the Metropolitan Police Service.

While we understand that the public will clearly be appalled by these events, I would urge each and every member of our communities to remain united against extremism and hate.

Police Scotland will not tolerate any attempts to target any community by any misguided individual or group and will work with all of our partners to resolve any issues and address any concerns. Should anyone become a victim of, or witness to, any hate crime, they should contact the police and report the incident.

Please be assured that Police Scotland continues to work with partners at home and abroad to counter the threat from terrorism and ensure the safety and wellbeing of all our communities.

Please be vigilant and if you suspect something is wrong then report it to the police. If you have any concerns or information about suspicious activity please contact the Police on 101, the UK Anti-Terrorism Hotline on 0800 789 321, Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111, or in an emergency dial 999.

Police Scotland continues to dynamically review all safety and security plans and operations. An element of this includes ensuring our armed policing and specialist resources are appropriately deployed.

The UK threat level remains at Severe. We have no specific information that Scotland is at risk of attack and I would ask you to go about your business as normal, remaining alert but not alarmed.

Thank you for your continued support in keeping our communities safe.

Steve Johnson

Assistant Chief Constable

We here at Fife Centre for Equalities would also like to make a statement about the horrific events that unfolded on Saturday:

We are all deeply saddened by the attack that took place in London on Saturday 03 June 2017.  Our thoughts are with those who have been affected by the attack.  The images and survivors’ accounts shared by the media are disturbing and horrifying.  We understand that many of us are distressed by what happened.  We support Police Scotland by asking you to remain calm and untied against extremism and hate.  If you need to speak to someone, please feel free to contact us at FCE.”

General Election 2017: Equality Hustings 31/05/2017 Evaluation Report

hustings4
FCE GE2017 Equality Hustings – Introductions

FCE hosted a General Election Equality Hustings with the aim of giving members of the community the opportunity to question Fife candidates on a range of themes and topics. Hustings, or Q&A sessions, are public meetings organised to give voters a better understanding of how different political parties would tackle equality issues that matter to them.

Panel
Our panel (From L-R): James Calder, Dave Dempsey, Lesley Laird and Roger Mullin

On our panel were four representatives: James Calder (Scottish Liberal Democrats), Dave Dempsey (Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party), Lesley Laird (Scottish Labour) and Roger Mullin (Scottish National Party) and the session was chaired by Leah Ganley, our Information and Communications Officer.

hustings1
FCE Equality Volunteer Mary starts off the Hustings with a question on diversity in politics

Opening introductions dived straight into equality topics, with candidates highlighting that the event was a welcome occasion to not only focus on #IndyRef2 or party-bashing but to discuss the equality implications of Brexit, changes in UK immigration, erosion of disability rights, global LGBT discrimination, gender bias, the rape clause and the issue of lack of diversity in politics.

The Q&A session was covered online on Twitter (see the full breakdown via #fcehustings hashtag) and Facebook – see some quotes below:

All candidates’ introductory statements: Brexit, Independence, EU, history but only one addressing equalities @LesleyLaird #fcehustings

  • Judy Hamilton‏ @judyinfife

Our volunteer Mary kicked off Q&A with her question about inclusive politicalrepresentation. #fcehustings #GE2017

  • Nina Munday‏ @FCE_Nina

@jCalderLibDem “I am ashamed of our country on the way we are dealing with the Refugee crisis. I think we can way more” #fcehustings

  • Dunfermline Lib Dems‏ @DunfLibDems

#fcehustings #GE2017 Dave Dempsey Conservatives – Tories must be the party of the many, as Tories are the party in power.

  • Bill Mair @Filosofo1961

Good to talk about equalities. Thanks to everyone who came along and asked questions. Democracy in action. #fcehustings @theSNP

  • Roger Mullin @RogMull

Please note that we have a full video recording of the session – with a note thanks to Craig Duncan who took part in our previous Fife Council Local Election Equality Hustings and volunteered to film the event.

Thanks to Colin Johnston from K107 radio,  the whole session was recorded and broadcasted on Thursday 1 June at 8pm.

 

hustings11
Our volunteer media helpers – thanks Colin and Craig

For a PDF of this report, please click the following link: FCE Equality Hustings General Election Evaluation Report – updated.

Diversity Week 2017: Sustainable Inclusion

Diversity Week is under way! Our theme for 2017 is Sustainable Inclusion and will kick off with our AGM and seminar on Monday 4 September, followed by a range of events across Fife’s localities and concluding with the Diversity Gala on Sunday 10 September.

IMG_20170510_150300[1]
Diversity Week 2017: planning the ‘Sustainable Inclusion’ theme

We will publish the Diversity Week 2017 programme with more details on the full range of events and locations as they get confirmed. Meanwhile, save the dates below for your diary:

Monday 4 September (am)
Fife Centre for Equalities AGM & Diversity Week Launch
https://fce2017agm.eventbrite.co.uk

Monday 4 September (pm)
Diversity Week Seminar: Sustainable Inclusion
https://diversityweek2017seminar.eventbrite.co.uk

Sunday 10 September (pm)
Diversity Week Gala @ Festival of Dunfermline: 
https://diversityweek2017gala.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Get Involved

If you would like to learn more about the theme, organise events or are able to help us in any way during the week, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Further Information

About Diversity Week Fife:

https://centreforequalities.org.uk/diversity-week-fife/

Event Hashtags
#diversityweekfife #dw2017

 

FCE Weekly Catchup – w/c 8 May 2017

Hello,

We would like to invite you to attend our General Election Equality Hustings and put your questions to the candidates. We will focus on topics at UK level. The Hustings will be held on Wednesday 30 May 2017, from 18:30 to 20:30, at New Volunteer House, 16 East Fergus Place, Kirkcaldy KY1 1XT. Light refreshments will be served from 18:00. Please book a place through EventBrite. If you have any additional requirements, please let us know by noon on 24 May 2017.

Only very few places are left for the FCE Inclusive Communication Workshop, which will take place on Wednesday 24 May 2017, from 09:30 to 16:00, at Kinghorn Community Centre, Rossland Place, Kinghorn, Burntisland KY3 9SS. The workshop is aimed at expanding the participants’ understanding of inclusive communication, as well as helping them to develop strategies for tackling communication barriers. Please book your place using EventBrite as soon as possible, to avoid disappointment.

A quick reminder that we would welcome your views on our Strategic Plan 2017-2020, which is open for consultation, by Monday 15 May 2017, using SurveyMonkey!

The free Adult Protection training course Effective Working Together, is available for booking. There are also free online courses open to all, please book here. For more information, please contact Shirley Black, 03451555555 Ext.442654 or apc.training@fife.gov.uk.

Thank you for your attention.